The European Union's new GDPR privacy laws are going into effect today, and tech companies everywhere are struggling to adapt to the new rules.

The GDPR, for the unaware, is a set of new regulations that aim to give EU consumers more control over how their data is used online. For example, users can now request that a company delete the information it has stored about them or correct it if it's inaccurate.

At any rate, it seems a few companies aren't adapting to the GDPR as quickly as some would like -- Austrian privacy activist Max Schrems has filed numerous legal complaints against Facebook and Google for allegedly violating the GDPR's new rules.

Specifically, Schrems takes issue with how the two tech giants now require users to consent to their adjusted privacy policies before gaining access to their services. Schrems feels this is a violation of the GDPR rules surrounding "particularized" consent.

The complaints Schrems has filed so far are reportedly worth about 7.6 billion euro, or $8.86 billion.

The complaints Schrems has filed so far are reportedly worth about 7.6 billion euro, or $8.86 billion. These complaints were registered with the CNIL, a French data protection authority, according to the Irish Times.

In a statement to the Financial Times, Schrems said the companies in question "totally know" that they're violating GDPR rules, but both companies have denied this is the case.

Indeed, Facebook reportedly says they've "prepared for the past 18 months" to ensure they comply fully with the GDPR's requirements, and Google says they are "committed to complying" with GDPR rules.

Regardless, if Schrems' complaints have merit, they will be forwarded to the appropriate GDPR authorities for further investigation.